Our Medical Team

 

The following medical professionals are part of our medical review team.

We focus on ensuring our content is accurate, evidence-based, current, and trustworthy.

 

As a trusted consumer CBD provider in the United States, we proactively update our content as new research becomes available. We strive to be your most trusted CBD resource in your pursuit of health and well-being.



Team

 

Kimberly Langdon M.D.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/kimberly-langdon-m-d-41847610/

 

Chief Medical Officer, Coologics, 2010-present

The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Doctor of Medicine 1987-1991

The Ohio State University Hospital Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency Program 1991-1995

Private Practice 1995-2010

Kimberly Langdon M.D. is a retired, board-certified obstetrician/gynecologist with 19-years of clinical experience. She graduated from The Ohio State University College of Medicine, earning Honors in many rotations. She then completed her OB/GYN residency program at The Ohio State University Medical Center, earning first-place for her senior research project and placed in the 98th percentile on the national exam for OB/GYN residents in the U.S.

She specialized in gynecologic diseases such as menopause, hormone replacement therapy including bioidentical hormones, osteoporosis, urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, menstrual disorders, vaginitis, infertility, contraception, pelvic pain, sexually transmitted infections, polycystic ovarian syndrome, endometriosis, and minimally-invasive surgeries. She is a national expert in vaginal infections.

After clinical practice, she founded a medical device company where she invented six patented medical devices for both life-threatening and non-life-threatening conditions. Her inventions are the first and only non-chemical cures for microbial infections and a novel model and method of use for menstrual cups.

 

Susan Lindeman, Contributor

Susan is a young mother and writer, passionate about cooking and blogging. She makes CBD-infused foods, like cookies and candies, to help her cope with anxiety and perform her daily tasks better.

 

Clarence Swader, Contributor

Clarence is a medical marijuana patient, writer, and hiking enthusiast who spends most of his time outdoors. He loves nature and is continuously trying to discover and write about its benefits for general health.

 

Daniel Bischoff, Editor

Daniel is a fur parent to five dogs and devotes the majority of his free hours to animal care and writing. He writes about how CBD is both beneficial not just for people but also to animals.


The Journal of Rare  
DISORDERS  
From the Publisher:  
Welcome to the third issue of The Journal of Rare Disorders (JORD). There have been many excing advances in the  
eld of rare disorders and we are proud to be part of the dynamic discussion. Researchers and clinicians are making  
huge strides in treang these diseases and we hope to advance that mission with insighul arcles that raise  
awareness and oer new therapeuc opons. We are looking forward to the second half of 2014 and plan on  
publishing even more meaningful arcles for the praccing physician. We are especially seeking clinical case studies  
that oer informaon on diagnosing rare disorders as this is a parcular hurdle that paents oen encounter.  
The rst arcle of this issue by Dr. Vincent Scoglieet al, discusses the development of a clinical protocol for the  
treatment of Idiopathic granulomatous masꢀꢀs (IGM). IGM is an uncommon benign chronic inammatory breast  
lesion, characterized histologically by noncaseang granulomatous inammaon. It presents a challenging clinical  
scenario, as it can mimic breast carcinoma on imaging and physical examinaon.  
Our second arcle by Katrina J. Llewellyn, PhD et al, invesgates autosomaldominant myopathic disorder associated  
with diaphyseal medullary stenosis with malignant brous hisocytoma (DMSMFH) which is characterized by  
myopathy, bone fragility, and osteosarcoma associated with mutaons in the MTAP gene. The authors report on the  
myopathy in two cousins with DMSMFH.  
Proper design and reporng of clinical trials in rare diseases typically require nonstandard stascal approaches that  
may generally be oponal in convenonal large clinical trials. In our third arcle Alemayehu PhD et al, discuss some  
key stascal points for consideraon in the design, analysis, and reporng of such trials.  
Ter Haar syndrome (THS) is one of the most deleterious disorders known in medicine today. THS is characterized by  
congenital glaucoma, craniofacial abnormalies, hypertelorism, kyphoscoliosis, skeletal dysplasia, congenital heart  
defects, and developmental delay. In this case report Dr. Eda Haznedaroglu et al, discuss treatment of a paent with  
extreme longevity.  
Finally, we include the Rare Disease Impact Report. This report was produced by Shire in collaboraon with an expert  
global panel of paent advocates, physicians, and policy experts in the rare disease eld. This global panel conducted  
survey research in the United States (US) and United Kingdom (UK) to determine the health, psychosocial, and  
economic impact of rare diseases among paent and medical communies. Key ndings published in this Rare  
Disease Impact Report idenfy and quanfy the impact of rare diseases based on survey responses from a mulꢀ‐  
stakeholder audience of paents/caregivers, physicians, payors, and thought leaders.  
The coming months promise to oer dynamic developments in rare disorders. New therapies are in development  
that will oer help to many paents who are without eecve treatment opons. We hope the rare disease  
community will connue to meet this challenge and we encourage those in academia, regulaon, and  
commercializaon of therapies to send your manuscripts, case studies, suggesons, and feedback to us at  
www.journalofraredisorders.com/ContactUs.htm  

The Journal of Rare Disorders 

M. Ian Phillips, PhD, DSc, FAHA

Norris Professor of Life Sciences

and Director of the Center for Rare

Disease Therapies

Keck Graduate Institute,

Claremont, CA

 

Tim Coté, MD, MPH

Former Director of the Office of  

Orphan Product Development, FDA  

Professor of Regulatory Practice  

Keck Graduate Institute,  

Claremont, CA

Principal, Coté Orphan Consulting,

LLC, Silver Spring, MD

 

From the Editors  

Welcome to the first issue of The Journal of Rare Disorders (JRD). Currently, not a single journal in the United States is devoted to rare disorders. Now, for the first time, we bring together all aspects of rare diseases into one journal: the science, progress on new therapies, new drugs, and issues of drug regulation and cost.  Papers on orphan drugs or rare disorders previously could only be published in specialty journals; however, our journal offers readers an open‐access, online option to publish important new work in this field. We  also anticipate contributing to awareness of the different types of rare disorders, and educating our readers about patient advocacy and the costs, both financial and personal, of these diseases. Although, by definition, a single rare disorder affects fewer than 200,000 Americans, more than 7000 rare disorders have been diagnosed in the United States. Over 25 million patients are affected, of which approximately half are children. Information is often scarce, and physicians face many challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. To facilitate the exchange of information in this crucial area, the first U.S. journal dedicated to providing a forum for the discussion of rare disorders has been established. This peer‐reviewed publication will focus on cutting‐ edge topics and is meant to expand the body of knowledge in this field. Published quarterly, The Journal of Rare Disorders accepts for consideration original research, open‐label studies, review articles, regulatory issues, case reports, and editorials. The journal is co‐edited by Keck Graduate Institute faculty M. Ian Phillips and Timothy R. Coté. Dr. Phillips is the Norris Professor of Life Sciences and the Director of the Center for Rare Disease Therapies. Dr. Coté is the former Director of the Office of Orphan Products Development at the US Food and Drug Administration and currently holds the position of Professor of Regulatory Practice at Keck. This inaugural issue covers Birt‐Hogg‐Dubé syndrome, familial and sporadic 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge     syndrome/velocardiofacial syndrome), rare and orphan disease challenges, and an article by the Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium, entitled "Overview, Progress, and Future Directions." In future issues, we hope to focus on specific therapeuTIc areas and to include useful tools for the practicing physician. Because diagnosis is a big hurdle that patients often encounter in the course of identifying their disease, we especially welcome clinical case studies that illustrate information about diagnosis. We are committed to making this new journal of value to the rare disease community, including physicians, researchers, regulators, paTIent advocacy groups, and pharmaceutical companies involved in developing orphan therapies. We look forward to dynamic interaction with the rare disorder community and leaders in science and medical research. We encourage those in academia, regulation, and commercialization of therapies to send your manuscripts, case studies, suggestions, and feedback to us.

 

M. Ian Phillips, PhD, DSc, FAHA

Tim Coté, MD, MPH

 

---

 

ANNOUNCING

The Journal of Rare Disorders

A peer-reviewed, clinically oriented series covering the

latest advances in rare disorders

 

Co-Editors

Tim Coté, MD, MPH

Former Director of the Office of Orphan Product Development FDA

Professor of Regulatory Practice Keck Graduate Institute

Claremont, CA

 

M. Ian Phillips, PhD, DSc, FAHA

Norris Professor of Life Sciences and Director of the Center for Rare Disease Therapies

Faculty Director, PreMed Program Keck Graduate Institute

Claremont, CA

 

Rare Diseases affect 25 million patients in the United States and until now there was no single journal dedicated to the discussion of these disorders. The Journal of Rare Disorders is a quarterly, open access, online journal that provides a forum for original research, open-label studies, regulatory issues, review articles, case reports and editorials on all aspects of diagnosis and treatment of rare diseases.

 

The Journal Offers:

 

For Further Information and Author Guidelines

Please Contact:

Cindy Jablonowski

 

---

An Open Access Journal

There is never a fee to publish in The Journal of Rare Disorders.

All articles are chosen on the basis of scientific rigor.

The Editors of The Journal of Rare Disorders welcome manuscript submissions following the guidelines set forth below:

Authorship

The Journal of Rare Disorders considers manuscripts that conform to the established guidelines of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), as described in “Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals: Writing and Editing for Biomedical Publication.” These guidelines are available at http://www.icmje.org.

As stated in the ICMJE Uniform Requirements, credit for authorship requires substantial contributions to conception and design, acquisition of data, or analysis and interpretation of data; drafting of the manuscript or critical revision for important intellectual content; and final approval of the version to be published.

Financial Disclosure

Authors are required to disclose, in writing, any financial interests (e.g., employment, consultancies, stock ownership or options other than mutual funds, honoraria, expert testimony) in the materials or subject matter dealt with in the manuscript.

Manuscript Components

All manuscripts should be in English, typed, and double-spaced, with the pages numbered. The title page of the paper should include a concise title of the article; the full name(s) of the author(s), highest academic degree(s) (eg, MD), and professional affiliation; and complete contact information – including mailing address, telephone, fax, and e-mail address – of the corresponding author.

Footnotes and uncommon abbreviations should be avoided whenever possible. When abbreviations or symbols are used, they should be defined in the text the first time they appear; any tables and figures should be referred to in the text. Graphics that have been published elsewhere must be accompanied by written consent from the original author and publisher for print and electronic reproduction.

 

Types of Publications for Submission

Original Research Articles

Should contain the following components:

Structured Abstract

The abstract should be divided into the following sections: 1. Background Information, 2. Methodology, 3. Results, 4. Conclusions and 5. Key Words. Length should be less than or equal to 350 words.

Background

This is meant to provide the reader with relevant clinical information on the disease state of interest and review the current understanding of the subject matter to be presented. When possible, the unmet needs that exist within this therapeutic area should be included and specifically how this research contributes to increasing the body of knowledge in this field.

Methodology

This section should include a detailed description of the study design, relevant information on study participants, and type of statistical analysis if appropriate. When mentioning drug names, generic names as well as dosage and route of administration should be included.

For all manuscripts involving human subjects, it should be noted that appropriate ethical standards were maintained while conducting the research and that consent was obtained from all study participants.

Results

Results should be presented in tables with accompanying diagrams whenever possible. When applicable, p-values as well as risk reductions should be included.

Discussion

This section should provide clinical relevance as to the implications and impact that the study findings have on management of patients with the condition of interest. Any limitations of the study design or results should also be mentioned.

Conclusion

This should be a brief statement of the main results and how they answer the original research objective. In addition, the implications this information has for future areas of research may be mentioned.

Article length

Less than or equal to 5000 words

Number of references

Less than or equal to 50 references

 

Graphics

Less than or equal to 6 tables, figures, or illustrations

Review Articles

Typically should be based on a comprehensive analysis of currently available literature. Clinical practice guidelines and meta-analyses are also welcome.

All submissions should include a concise title; an abstract; an introduction that states the specific purpose of the article; a review of the currently available literature and understanding of the therapeutic area of interest, and conclusion. If applicable, a section on methods that identifies the databases that were searched as well as key words or phrases and inclusion/exclusion criteria for identified articles; an assessment of the validity of reviewed studies; and a summary that includes future directions for studies in this area should be included.

Abstract length

Less than or equal to 350 words

Article length

Less than or equal to 5000 words

Number of references

Less than or equal to 150 references

Graphics

Less than or equal to 6 tables, figures, or illustrations

Case Reports

Case reports describe observations of new or unusual events (eg, relating to a clinical condition, association, reaction, or treatment) in one or more patients that can advance basic understanding of a medical condition, increase clinical skills, or suggest the usefulness of further research. These reports typically include rare, unexpected associations or events and should include data that describe the salient features of the case. The report should be factual, concise, logically organized, and clearly presented. Consistent with ICMJE guidelines, no identifying information–including patients’ names, initials, or healthcare facility identification numbers – should be published in case studies to protect patient privacy and confidentiality.

The case report should include a concise title, a structured abstract, an introduction, a description of the case, discussion, summary, and any relevant references.

Tables or figures that present data in a readily interpretable form may be included. The introduction should announce the subject and purpose of the report, including statements of why the case is important. The case description should include a narrative account of the case with pertinent clinical, laboratory, and medication information. Discussion may include evidence that the case is new or unusual and consider possible alternative explanations for case features. The summary may include questions for further consideration, request for input from other experts in the field, and preliminary conclusions of the author.

Abstract length

Less than or equal to 150 words

 

Report length

Less than or equal to 1500 words

References

Less than or equal to 15

Graphics

Less than or equal to 2 tables, figures, or illustrations

Letters to the Editor

These are opinion pieces of papers published in a previous issue of The Journal of Rare Disorders. These letters are meant to provide the author’s interpretation of the mentioned article and authors are encouraged to present a firm case to justify a point of view. All accepted letters will be sent to the author of the original paper for a response.

Article length

Less than or equal to 1000 words

References

Less than or equal to 10

Commentary

The Editorial Board will solicit authors to comment on a specific research article that may or may not be published in the same issue of the journal. These are meant to provide readers with an insightful and thoughtful interpretation of the original published article by providing clinical relevance as well as highlighting any strengths or weaknesses deemed relevant by the author.

Article length

Less than or equal to 1000 words

References

Less than or equal to 10

Manuscript Preparation

Any contributions to the research or assistance in manuscript preparation by any person(s) other than the authors must be acknowledged in this section.

References

The accuracy of all references cited is the responsibility of the author. References should be numbered in the order in which they appear in the text and the full references listed in the corresponding order at the end of the manuscript. The listing of references should comply with the format set forth in the American Medical Association Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors. (see following samples for journal articles, books, and Web sites). Data on file and material that has been “submitted for publication” should not be included in the references.

Reference to a journal article should include the last names and initials of the authors; full title of the article; title of the journal (as per AMA style), italicized; year of publication; volume number; and inclusive pages of the article.

For example: Pereira MA, Kartashov AI, Ebbeling CB, et al. Fast-food habits, weight gain, and insulin resistance (the CARDIA study):15-year prospective analysis. Lancet. 2005;365:36–42.

Reference to a book should include the last names and initials of the authors and/or editors; chapter title; book title, italicized; edition number; place of publication; publisher; year of publication; and inclusive pages.

For example: Anderson RM, Funnel MM, Carlson A, et al. Facilitating self-care through empowerment. In: Snoek FJ, Skinner TC, eds. Psychology in Diabetes Care. West Essex, UK: John Wiley& Sons, Ltd; 2000:69–97.

Reference to a Web site should include its name, article title, Web site address, and date the Web site was accessed.

For example: World Medical Association. Declaration of Helsinki: Ethical principles for medical research involving human subjects. Available at: http://www.wma.net/e/policy/pdf/17c.pdf. Accessed July 1, 2005.

Guidelines For Submitting Graphics, Tables or Illustrations

All graphics, tables or illustrations must be submitted on disk or electronically and in the appropriate format discussed below. In addition, a hard copy must accompany all electronic files.

Files can be emailed to: cindy@scicomgroup.com.

Hard copy files should be mailed to:

Cindy Jablonowski, Publisher

The Journal of Rare Disorders

33 Brandon Ave.

Monroe Township, N.J. 08831

Acceptable File Formats

Each Table should be prepared in Microsoft Word. If more than one table is to be submitted, each should be printed on a separate page. The location of each table should be referred to in the text and numbered in the order of appearance. In addition, a short descriptive title should be included.

Figures should be submitted in jpg, tiff, or eps format; photographs and photocopies are not usable. Figures submitted in any other format may be redrawn and forwarded for review to authors who will be responsible for the accuracy of the new illustrations. Use arrows indicating the top of the figures where needed.

Each figure should be referred to in the text and numbered in the order of appearance. If more than one figure is to be submitted, each should be printed on a separate page.

Submit Manuscripts To

 

Cindy Jablonowski, Publisher

The Journal of Rare Disorders

33 Brandon Ave.

Monroe Township, N.J. 08831

mailto:cindy@scicomgroup.com

-----

 

Rare Disorders Journal

The Editors of The Journal of Rare Disorders welcome manuscript submissions following the guidelines set forth below:

 

Authorship

The Journal of Rare Disorders considers manuscripts that conform to the established guidelines of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), as described in “Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals: Writing and Editing for Biomedical Publication.” These guidelines are available at http://www.icmje.org.

 

As stated in the ICMJE Uniform Requirements, credit for authorship requires substantial contributions to conception and design, acquisition of data, or analysis and interpretation of data; drafting of the manuscript or critical revision for

important intellectual content; and final approval of the version to be published. 

 

Financial Disclosure

Authors are required to disclose, in writing, any financial interests (e.g., employment, consultancies, stock ownership or options other than mutual funds, honoraria, expert testimony) in the materials or subject matter dealt with in the

manuscript.

 

Manuscript Components

All manuscripts should be in English, typed, and double-spaced, with the pages numbered. The title page of the paper should include a concise title of the article; the full name(s) of the author(s), highest academic degree(s) (eg, MD), and professional affiliation; and complete contact information – including mailing address, telephone, fax, and e-mail address – of the corresponding author. 

 

Footnotes and uncommon abbreviations should be avoided whenever possible. When abbreviations or symbols are used, they should be defined in the text the first

time they appear; any tables and figures should be referred to in the text. Graphics that have been published elsewhere must be accompanied by written consent from the original author and publisher for print and electronic reproduction.

 

Types of Publications for Submission

 

Original Research Articles

Should contain the following components:

 

Structured Abstract

The abstract should be divided into the following sections: 1. Background

Information, 2. Methodology, 3. Results, 4. Conclusions and 5. Key Words.

Length should be less than or equal to 350 words.

 

Background

This is meant to provide the reader with relevant clinical information on the disease state of interest and review the current understanding of the subject matter to

be presented. When possible, the unmet needs that exist within this therapeutic

area should be included and specifically how this research contributes to increasing the body of knowledge in this field.   

 

Methodology

This section should include a detailed description of the study design, relevant

information on study participants, and type of statistical analysis if appropriate. When mentioning drug names, generic names as well as dosage and route of administration should be included. 

 

For all manuscripts involving human subjects, it should be noted that appropriate

ethical standards were maintained while conducting the research and that consent

was obtained from all study participants.

 

Results

Results should be presented in tables with accompanying diagrams whenever possible. When applicable, p-values as well as risk reductions should be included. 

 

Discussion

This section should provide clinical relevance as to the implications and impact that

the study findings have on management of patients with the condition of interest. Any limitations of the study design or results should also be mentioned.    

 

Conclusion

This should be a brief statement of the main results and how they answer the original research objective. In addition, the implications this information has for

future areas of research may be mentioned.  

 

Article length

Less than or equal to 5000 words

Number of references

Less than or equal to 50 references 

Graphics

Less than or equal to 6 tables, figures, or illustrations

 

Review Articles

Typically should be based on a comprehensive analysis of currently available literature. Clinical practice guidelines and meta-analyses are also welcome. 

 

All submissions should include a concise title; an abstract; an introduction that

states the specific purpose of the article; a review of the currently available

literature and understanding of the therapeutic area of interest, and

conclusion. If applicable, a section on methods that identifies the databases

that were searched as well as key words or phrases and inclusion/exclusion

criteria for identified articles; an assessment of the validity of reviewed

studies; and a summary that includes future directions for studies in this area

should be included.

 

Abstract length

Less than or equal to 350 words

Article length

Less than or equal to 5000 words

Number of references

Less than or equal to 150 references

Graphics

Less than or equal to 6 tables, figures, or illustrations

 

Case Reports

Case reports describe observations of new or unusual events (eg, relating to a clinical condition, association, reaction, or treatment) in one or more patients that can advance basic understanding of a medical condition, increase clinical skills, or suggest the usefulness of further research. These reports typically include rare, unexpected associations or events and should include data that describe the salient features of the case. The report should be factual, concise, logically organized, and clearly presented. Consistent with ICMJE guidelines, no identifying information–including patients’ names, initials, or healthcare facility identification numbers – should be published in case studies to protect patient privacy and confidentiality.

 

The case report should include a concise title, a structured abstract, an introduction, a description of the case, discussion, summary, and any relevant references.

Tables or figures that present data in a readily interpretable form may be included. The introduction should announce the subject and purpose of the report, including statements of why the case is important. The case description should include a narrative account of the case with pertinent clinical,

laboratory, and medication information. Discussion may include evidence that the

case is new or unusual and consider possible alternative explanations for case

features. The summary may include questions for further consideration, request

for input from other experts in the field, and preliminary conclusions of the

author.

 

Abstract length

Less than or equal to 150 words

Report length

Less than or equal to 1500 words

References

Less than or equal to 15

Graphics

Less than or equal to 2 tables, figures, or illustrations

 

Letters to the Editor

These are opinion pieces of papers published in a previous issue of The Journal of

Rare Disorders. These letters are meant to provide the author’s interpretation of the mentioned article and authors are encouraged to present a firm case to justify a point of view. All accepted letters will be sent to the author of the original paper for a response.

 

Article length

Less than or equal to 1000 words

References

Less than or equal to 10 

 

Commentary

The Editorial Board will solicit authors to comment on a specific research article that may or may not be published in the same issue of the journal. These are meant to provide readers with an insightful and thoughtful interpretation of the original published article by providing clinical relevance as well as highlighting any strengths or weaknesses deemed relevant by the author. 

 

Article length

Less than or equal to 1000 words

References

Less than or equal to 10

 

Manuscript Preparation

Any contributions to the research or assistance in manuscript preparation by any person(s) other than the authors must be acknowledged in this section.

 

References

The accuracy of all references cited is the responsibility of the author. References should be numbered in the order in which they appear in the text and the full

references listed in the corresponding order at the end of the manuscript. The

listing of references should comply with the format set forth in the American

Medical Association Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors. (see following samples for journal articles, books, and Web sites). Data on file and material that has been “submitted for publication” should not be included in the references.

 

Reference to a journal article should include the last names and initials of the authors; full title of the article; title of the journal (as per AMA style), italicized; year of publication; volume number; and inclusive pages of the article. 

 

For example: Pereira MA, Kartashov AI, Ebbeling CB, et al. Fast-food habits,

weight gain, and insulin resistance (the CARDIA study):15-year prospective analysis. Lancet. 2005;365:36–42.

 

Reference to a book should include the last names and initials of the authors and/or editors; chapter title; book title, italicized; edition number; place of publication; publisher; year of publication; and inclusive pages.

 

For example: Anderson RM, Funnel MM, Carlson A, et al. Facilitating self-care through empowerment. In: Snoek FJ, Skinner TC, eds. Psychology in Diabetes Care. West Essex, UK: John Wiley& Sons, Ltd; 2000:69–97.

 

Reference to a Web site should include its name, article title, Web site address, and date the Web site was accessed.

 

For  example: World Medical Association. Declaration of Helsinki: Ethical principles

for medical research involving human subjects. Available at: http://www.wma.net/e/policy/pdf/17c.pdf. Accessed July 1, 2005.

 

Guidelines For Submitting Graphics, Tables or Illustrations

All graphics, tables or illustrations must be submitted on disk or electronically and in the appropriate format discussed below. In addition, a hard copy must accompany all electronic files. 

 

Files can be emailed to: cindy@scicomgroup.com.

Hard copy files should be mailed to:

Cindy Jablonowski, Publisher

The Journal of Rare Disorders

33 Brandon Ave.

Monroe Township, N.J.

08831

 

Acceptable File Formats

Each Table should be prepared in Microsoft Word. If more than

one table is to be submitted,  each should be printed on a separate page. The location of each table should be referred to in the text and numbered in the order of appearance. In addition, a short descriptive title should be included.

 

Figures should be submitted in jpg, tiff, or eps format; photographs and photocopies

are not usable. Figures submitted in any other format may be redrawn and forwarded for review to authors who will be responsible for the accuracy of the

new illustrations. Use arrows indicating the top of the figures where needed.

Each figure should be referred to in the text and numbered in the order of appearance. If more than one figure is to be submitted, each should be printed

on a separate page.

 

Submit Manuscripts To

Cindy Jablonowski, Publisher

The Journal of Rare

Disorders

33 Brandon Ave.

Monroe Township, N.J. 08831

 

cindy@scicomgroup.com

 

----

 

Rare Disorders Journal

 

Co-Editors

M. Ian Phillips PhD, DSc, FAHA

Norris Professor of Life Sciences and Director 

Center for Rare Disease Therapies

Faculty Director, PreMed Program

Keck Graduate Institute, Claremont, CA 

 

Tim Coté, MD, MPH

Professor of Regulatory Practice at Keck Graduate Institute

 

----